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Archive for the ‘Maps’ Category

Please see this introduction for info about these three 1921 maps.

Gee! Too bad we didn’t quite make it to Shelter Cove… well another trip back to the DNR and i may get that, too.

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Belcher’s 1921 map, upriver

See previous post,the first in this series of three, for a little info about these 1921 maps.

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1921 Belcher’s map, north

This is one of the most complete and accurate property-ownership maps we have. They are especially interesting for the I.A. notation, meaning “Indian Allotment,” on several of the parcels on Prosper Ridge. I got the map sections from the Department of Natural Resources in Eureka, on two different occasions. The first set (downriver near Petrolia) i had copied years ago. Over the years i realized i should have the whole watershed on hand, so i went back… but this time i took photos of the map. These are the more blue-toned pictures. Anyway, a big thank-you to the DNR and its caretakers (in this recent case, Andrew Bundschuh) for keeping these maps on-hand, organized, and available to serious researchers.

As always, for explanations as to how to use the maps (if you have the description of a piece of property and are looking for it, for instance), go to this earlier post.

Note: This map is so big, i am splitting it into three sections… the lower Mattole Valley, and its coast; upriver (Upper Mattole to the Briceland area), and the “Lost Coast.” All sequences will travel north to south. Click on the map to open and enlarge; use control and the + sign to enlarge further.

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1916 Army Corps of Engineers maps

I found these maps at the Humboldt County Department of Natural Resources, a division of the Public Works Dept., at 2nd and L Streets in Eureka. Years ago i had been in there and had some of the downriver maps photocopied; since then John Isom has given us the remaining Mattole sections. I am grateful to the staff at the DNR for allowing me to copy these materials.

Sections of four maps are presented here: the Cape Mendocino, Glynn, Pt. Delgada, and Briceland quadrangles. There is a lot of detail, and unfortunately, the file sizes are unwieldy. Still, if you blow them up too much, they will be pixelly. I tried to find a compromise. If you would personally like a better-resolution copy of any particular section, please ask me and i will email it to you.

These Corps of Engineers maps, made from surveys done in 1916 and printed by “Engineer Reproduction Plant, U.S. Army, Fort Humphreys, D.C., 1921,” don’t use the same township-and-range, 36-square-mile-block system as the other historical maps here. They are on a scale of 1/62,500. Since we can’t rely on your computer screen to represent inches fairly, please understand that one of the smaller, darker-lined squares measures about 2 and 7/8 miles, or 5000 yards, across. Unfortunately, those squares are only outlined on the Briceland and Cape Mendocino quadrangles, which also show the larger 5-minute (a minute being a 60th of a degree) squares. These big 5-minute boxes measure about 4 and ½ miles across and are represented by the only lines on the Glynn and Pt. Delgada maps.

On the original, an inch=a mile, so if you can adjust the size of your image until the smaller boxes are 2 and 7/8 true inches wide, and the larger, lightly-lined squares 4 and ½ inches, you can use that one-to-one scale: inches on your screen will equal miles.

As usual, the map sequence is NW progressing to the SE, upriver; then back to the Cooskie-King Range coast, north to south. Click on each image to enlarge it; click again for more magnification; and your own computer’s zoom function (usually control and +) will bring you in even further.

Cape Mendocino, north section

Cape Mendocino, southern section

Glynn, SW section

Pt. Delgada, NE section

Briceland, north section

Briceland, southern section

Pt. Delgada, NW section

Pt. Delgada, SE section

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I have had these map copies around for a while. I believe i originally copied them from the Dept. of Natural Resources office on L Street in Eureka– they have a nice collection of maps and photos there, sorted into drawers by community. Denny’s is a great map because it’s so detailed, and as far as i can find, quite reliable.

The usual instructions: Find any general map-use guidelines you might need from this previous post. Also, as in all these map series i will put up, the areas overlap as they travel upstream, then back to the King Range coastline. Click and enlarge for detail, or use your control/+ function to go in until the pixels become annoying.

More maps to come, in the coming weeks or months… stay tuned!

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Phil Franklin of Petrolia gave us this wonderful map. It is very similar in form to the 1911 Denny’s map, so i had assumed that the clippings of it that i’d seen came from an earlier Denny’s; but no, Phil’s intact map showed the publishing information, definitely J.N. Lentell, 1898.

The usual instructions: Find any general map-use guidelines you might need from this previous post. Also, as in all these map series i will put up, the areas overlap as they travel upstream, then back to the King Range coastline. Click and enlarge for detail, or use your control/+ function to go in until the pixels become annoying.

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1886 Forbes map

The Stanley N. Forbes map, published in 1886. I would like to thanks Richard “Rob” Roberts, known through the Ferndale Museum and Ann Roberts (his wife), not to mention his exhaustive work republishing the Seth Kinman material, for sharing this with us. The 1880s were a mystery period to me, mapwise. This fills in a lot of gaps!

Find any general map-use guidelines you might need from this previous post. Also, as in all these map series i will put up, the areas overlap as they travel upstream, then back to the King Range coastline. Click and enlarge for detail, or use your control/+ function to go in until the pixels become annoying.

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