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Posts Tagged ‘Harrow’

I’m happy to be putting up more of the pictures that Phillip Nicklas, great-great-grandson of Jim Boots and Birdie Harrow, gave us. Now we are up to the 1920s, so let’s get right to it… i will try to fill in the information as the pictures come. (The earlier pictures are here.)

Except for this brief reminder of who’s who! Jim was the son of Mary Ellen “Ella” Vandecarr and Aaron Boots–Aaron was one of five Boots siblings who stayed around Southern Humboldt for most of their lives. They, and two or more others who lived in Washington, were the offspring of Upper Mattole pioneers “Granny” (Sarah) and Elijah Boots. Jim’s wife, Adeline “Birdie” Harrow Boots, was the child of Katherine “Kate” Titus (daughter of GMG Titus, and sister of LaFayette Titus) and Joel Fletcher “Fletch” Harrow (son of Asa Harrow).

Jim Boots (1883-1963) and Birdie (1889-1980) were the parents of four girls: Mabel, or “Babe,” Phillip’s gt-grandmother; Viola, called “Vie,” who married Mike Stefanini; Clara, who married John William Lundberg and had a son, Jimmy–this family was the connection to the Arcata property where Phillip and his wife now live; and Arlene, also known as “Birdie” or “Bootsie,” the baby, who married a Mr. Harvey and had a son Ted and daughter Judy.

Babe Boots married twice, to Harold Hash and to a Mr. Hengen; her daughter was Barbara Hash Smith, born in 1927, who had a daughter Cynthia–Phillip’s mother. We start these pictures when Babe, born in 1908, is a young teen girl.

(Click on the photos for enlargement and better detail.)

Top, left-right, Viola, Mabel "Babe," & Clara, with Bootsie in front.

Top, left-right, Clara, Mabel “Babe,” & Vie, with Bootsie in front.

Jim Boots with his bus and daughters, near Carlotta, 1922.

Jim Boots with his bus and daughters, near Carlotta, 1922.

Jim Boots, his mother Ella, and his four girls. (Unless that's mother Birdie on the right, and we are only seeing three of the daughters.) I am not sure where some of these photos were taken, as the family moved around to several Humboldt locations over the years.

Jim Boots, his mother Ella, and his four girls. (Unless that’s mother Birdie on the right, and we are only seeing three of the daughters.) I am not sure where some of these photos were taken, as the family moved around to several Humboldt locations over the years.

Here are Birdie (far left) and Jim with Mabel, Clara, Bootsie, and Vie; the three people in the right rear are unknown. I'm curious about the man on the far right; he shows up in several of our pictures of tanbarking crews.

Here are Birdie (far left) and Jim with Mabel, Clara, Bootsie, and Vie; the three people in the right rear are unknown. I’m curious about the man on the far right; he shows up in several of our pictures of tanbarking crews.

Babe hamming it up.

Babe hamming it up.

Here is Babe in her first true glamour shot. She resembles a certain Hollywood actress who was recently in Humboldt County, we think.

Here is Babe in her first true glamour shot. She resembles a certain Hollywood actress who was recently in Humboldt County, we think.

A gathering of the Boots and Harrow families in Arcata, 1928. I will let you have fun figuring out who everyone is!

A gathering of the Boots and Harrow families in Arcata, 1928. I will let you have fun figuring out who everyone is!

Harold Hash makes his appearance, standing next to Babe. Her mother Ella has got her hat on and is looking fancy. Is the baby in front an infant Barbara (born 1927)?

Harold Hash makes his appearance, standing next to Babe. Her mother Ella has got her hat on and is looking fancy, next to her late-life daughter Bertha Boots, and her husband Aaron. Is the baby in front an infant Barbara Hash (born 1927), held up by her aunts?

John W. "Bill" Lundberg and Clara Boots, dating in 1929. By the looks of the hills, they're in the Mattole Valley. She and Bill married in 1934, and stayed together until he passed away in1978.

John W. “Bill” Lundberg and Clara Boots, dating in 1929. By the looks of the hills, they’re in the Mattole Valley. She and Bill married in 1934, and stayed together until he passed away in1978.

y-30s,Clara's swimsuit

Here is Clara a few years later in a classic 1930s swimsuit.

Harold Hash, wife Mabel "Babe" Boots, and daughter with the ringlets, Barbara Jean Hash.

Harold Hash, wife Mabel “Babe” Boots, and daughter with fancy ringlets, Barbara Hash.

Young Barbara, born 1927.

Young Barbara, born 1927.

Four generations, gt-grandmother Kate Titus Harrow on right; grandmother Birdie Harrow Boots center, and mother Mabel "Babe" Boots Hash, with Barbara in Sacramento.

Four generations: gt-grandmother Kate Titus Harrow on right; grandmother Birdie Harrow Boots center, and mother Mabel “Babe” Boots Hash, with Barbara in San Jose.

Barbara Hash and friend with bicycles, 1930s.

Barbara Hash and friend with bicycles, 1930s.

Barbara Jean Hash.

Barbara Jean Hash.

This is Birdie, mother of the four sisters, at the gas station on the northeast corner of 5th and G Streets, Arcata. Clara and her husband, Bill Lundberg, owned the gas station.

This is Birdie Harrow Boots, at the gas station on the northeast corner of 5th and G Streets, Arcata. Her daughter Clara and husband, Bill Lundberg, owned the gas station. The building is still there.

y-30s,Reunion-Jim,Birdie,&3 girls

A reunion. Birdie Harrow and Jim Boots with Mabel in the middle; not sure if that is Clara or Vie on the left, but it looks like the baby, Bootsie or Birdie, on the right.

y-30s,Aaron and Ellie Boots and children

Here’s the earlier generation reunited: Seated in front, Mary Ellen (Ella) Vandecarr and William (Aaron) Boots. Behind them, their seven children: Bertha Ida, born 1904; John (Elbert or Albert), born 1909; probably Adeline Susan (Addie), born 1898; Sarah, who had married a Mr. Conger, born 1885; Jim Boots; and twins William A. and Lillian, born 1896. (Note–i am not positive of all these identities; I may have put the wrong names on the wrong faces, except where i’m sure of Ella and Aaron, and of course Jim; and that is certainly Bertha on the far left.) An aside: Addie Boots Reynolds was shot by her love-crazed cousin Walter Boots–son of Aaron’s brother Martin– in 1934. She survived, but he turned the gun on himself and died.

y-Jim Boots 1930s

Jim Boots in the 1930s.

Another picture of four generations: Jim Boots, his mother Ella, daughter Birdie (Bootsie) Harvey, and grandson Ted Harvey.

Another picture of four generations: Jim Boots, his mother Ella, daughter Birdie (Bootsie) Harvey, and grandson Ted Harvey.

Mabel Babe Boots Hengen. Mother-Daughter day at the studio?

Mabel Babe Boots Hengen. Mother-Daughter day at the studio?

z-portrait,barbara smith

And here is the beautiful grown-up daughter, Barbara Hash.

Once again, I would like to thank Phillip Nicklas for letting us have copies of all these wonderful photos. They, and the family they represent, are beautiful, interesting, and… very Mattolian!

Now, one more old picture I want to add… this one goes back to the 1910s or earlier. Ivan Harrow, born in 1885 and dead in 1918, was the brother of Birdie Harrow Boots, they both being children of Kate Titus and Fletcher Harrow. This photo was labelled something like “Ivan Harrow and loggers.” The Harrow- Boots family, or at least some branches of it, retained its workingman-in-the-woods reality even as photographic studios and fashionable women created an uptown impression.

z-Loggers,wIvanHarrow

I am not sure which man is Ivan Harrow, but with five brothers, it’s likely there’s more than one Harrow here. Be sure to click on this one for detail. (Oh–! when you do, you’ll find some blue ink naming Ivan.)

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Elijah and Sarah “Granny” Boots were Mattole pioneers hailing from the Midwest. They arrived in the Mattole Valley in 1866, and found a “a tract of land on the north side of the Mattole River about eight and one-half miles from Petrolia. The land suited Boots’ ideas. It was an ideal place for hog-raising, cattle-raising, poultry-raising, and bee culture. Such being the case, Boots filed his homestead right on the land and acquired title to it, and held it until his death in 1901.” So says W.W. Roscoe in his History of the Mattole Valley. The land is now part of Francis Scarpulla’s Lost Coast Farms, and Francis has generously offered to show the place and its old Boots apple orchards to people interested in this  history. (Contact me so that we can communicate with him and make a plan, if you are interested in a tour; it’s been some time since he extended this offer.)

Elijah generally claimed to have been born in Ohio in 1814, though on some censuses he says Indiana; and Sarah Rebecca Jones Boots was born in 1816 in Indiana, according to most censuses, and Ohio or Tennessee on others. She lived until 1909. In about the year 1836, the two were married in Randolph Co., Indiana. As part of the great westward migration, they lived briefly in Missouri, then, in the 1850s, in Washington Territory, just north of the Columbia. In 1865 they decided to move to Humboldt County with their four younger children (Aaron, Mary Etta, Thomas, and John). I often wonder why a place is lit upon like that–did the Bootses know someone who was already here? If nothing else, they would have heard of the oil prospects of the area, and that the Indians had been thoroughly defeated. Well, they didn’t figure prominently in the oil boom–they were more like self-sufficient, community-minded small farmers. W.W. Roscoe goes on to relate that “It was often said that with ‘Granddaddy’ Boots’ simple tastes, he was, in effect, a wealthier man than Rockefeller. He is remembered as one of the most successful hog and bee raisers of the Mattole Valley. He was also a splendid rifle shot, and many a deer or panther (he called a panther a ‘painter’) went down before his well-aimed muzzle-loading rifle.”

Local history buffs have read a respectable amount about the Boots family (there are Boots stories from W.W. Roscoe and Ken and Neb Roscoe; in the Humboldt Historian; and in several other local books, family trees, or scrapbooks). But we didn’t have many photographs until recently meeting Elijah’s great-great-great-great grandson, Phillip Nicklas of Arcata. Phillip’s great-great grandfather was Jim Boots, who lived until 1963. And the sisters of his gt-grandmother–four beautiful daughters of Jim Boots and Birdie Harrow–produced distant cousins who passed on many of the old family photos to Phillip, who has a keen love of history. He also has the generosity to have shared with us a disc full of these old pictures, organized by decade. Today we will look at some of the pictures from the 1870s until the 1910s.

For handy reference, here is a rough sketch i worked up of the family’s genealogy:

Please click on this chart to enlarge it.

Please click on this chart to enlarge it.

And to make this a little more clear, how about a simple lineage:

7 generations back: Sarah and Elijah Boots, and Sarah and Asa Harrow.

6 generations: Their respective children, Aaron Boots (who married Mary Ellen Vandecarr) and Fletch Harrow (who married Kate Titus).

5 generations: Their respective children, Jim Boots and Birdie Harrow.

4 generations: Mabel “Babe” Boots.

3 generations: Barbara Hash Smith.

2 generations: Cynthia Nicklas.

Present: Phillip Nicklas.

GrannyBoots,finalPSfrBestScan,lo-res

Granddaddy and Granny Elijah and Sarah Boots, seated, with unknown descendants.

Here is Granny, in typical dress and hairstyle for the 1860s or '70s. This one photo was from our Mary Rackliff Etter collection.

Here is Granny, in typical dress and hairstyle for the 1860s or ’70s. This photo was from our Mary Rackliff Etter collection.

Johnny, a son of Granny and Elijah. He was a blacksmith who never married, but lived in the Mattole nearly all his life, until his death of cancer in 1908.

Johnny, a son of Granny and Elijah. He was a blacksmith who never married, but lived in the Mattole nearly all his life, until his death of cancer in 1908. Another photo from Mary Rackliff Etter.

I don’t know who the parents of Mary Ellen Vandecarr were, but can say that her genes made a strong stamp on the features of future generations, as you will see in photos below. Here is her image on an old tin-type photograph:

Mary Ellen (Ella) Vandecarr (Mrs. Aaron) Boots, at the age of 14.

Mary Ellen (Ella) Vandecarr (Mrs. Aaron) Boots, in the late 1870s at the age of 14.

William Aaron Boots, known as Aaron, on the left. Unknown on right.

William Aaron Boots, known as Aaron, on the left. The young man on the right is unidentified, but the paternal hand suggests it is Jim, who was 23 years younger. Perhaps.

Ivan and Delbert Harrow, with their sister Birdie, future bride of Aaron Boots, in the middle. From about

Ivan and Delbert Harrow, with their sister Birdie, future bride of Jim Boots, in the middle. From the early 1890s.

James E. Boots as a youth.

James E. Boots as a youth.

Jim Boots and Birdie Harrow, before their marriage in 1907. Hauling tanbark.

Jim Boots and Birdie Harrow, before their marriage in 1907. Hauling tanbark.

Photo taken in 1908, with Mabel

Photo taken in 1908, with Mabel “Babe” Boots as the baby in the center; her grandfather Aaron holds her, and grandmother Ella Vandecarr Boots is in the upper left. Her parents Jim and Birdie are on the right of the picture. I am not sure of the identities of the other children, those who so resemble Babe and her father and grandmother–possibly her aunt Bertha (born 1904) is one of them, and the others perhaps Addie or Lily and Bill, a few more of Jim’s much younger siblings.

Birdie (Adeline) Harrow Boots and daughter Mabel (Babe).

Birdie (Adeline) Harrow Boots and daughter Mabel (Babe).

Three generations: Birdie and Mabel Boots, Katherine Harrow and Les--her youngest, born 1909, and Mabel's little uncle--and Allie Harrow Carr, Birdie and Les's sister, with her baby Charlie.

Three generations: Birdie and her little Mabel Boots; Birdie’s mother Katherine Harrow holding Les–her youngest, born 1909, and Mabel’s uncle; and Allie Harrow Carr, Birdie and Les’s sister, with her baby Charlie.

Recreation on the Mattole: Fletch Harrow with his daughter Birdie and Jim Boots, and baby Mabel.

Recreation on the Mattole: Fletch Harrow with his daughter Birdie and Jim Boots, and baby Mabel in front of him.

Left to right, Vie or Viola, Birdie Boots, baby Bootsie, sometimes called Birdie, Jim Boots, Clara, and Mabel

Left to right: Vie or Viola, Birdie Boots, baby Bootsie, sometimes called Birdie, Jim Boots, Clara, and Mabel “Babe”.

Mabel

Mabel “Babe” Boots at age 8, with her dog. 1916.

Aunt Lily (Jim's sister) in a 1917 Dodge, with Aaron and Mary Ellen (Grandma to the girls), Jim Boots next to Vie and holding Bootsie, Clara, Babe, and their mother Birdie.

Aunt Lily (Jim’s sister) in a 1917 Dodge, with Aaron and Mary Ellen (Grandma to the girls), Jim Boots next to Vie and holding Bootsie, Clara, Babe, and their mother Birdie.

Briceland Saloon. Possibly well-known cowboy Jim O'Dell in the front, with the wooden leg.

Briceland Saloon. Probably “Bogus” Bill Frazier in the front, with the wooden leg. Click on this one; there’s lots of great detail.

Both of these Briceland photos were marked with the studio tag “Hazeltine, Mendocino.” Martin Mason Hazeltine was a photographer who practiced in Mendocino from 1866 or ’67 until at least 1883, then off and on until his death in Oregon in 1903. You can see a photo of his Mendocino studio, which i assume carried on under his name for some time after his 1880s departure, at this link.

The old Briceland Store. It looks as if a baseball game is noted on the blackboard behind these people. Notice the blue cross next to Jim Boots, and the Native man beneath it. There were many mixed-blood families in Briceland around the turn of the last century.

The old Briceland Store. It looks as if a baseball game line-up is noted on the blackboard behind these people. Notice the blue cross next to Jim Boots, and the Native man beneath it. There were many mixed-blood families in Briceland around the turn of the last century.

Mabel at the Garberville Hotel.

Mabel and friends in front of the Redwood Inn, south end of Garberville.

Jim Boots at the wheel of old Wagner Leather Co. truck. They were the Briceland tanbark company.

Jim Boots at the wheel of old Wagner Leather Co. truck. They were the Stockton-based leather tanning company who had an extraction plant in Briceland. 

Jim hauling tanbark.

Jim hauling tanbark.

Jim Boots tell his story in the slim volume, Golden Adventures from THE HUMBOLDT HISTORIAN. His selection is titled, “The Life of an Old Stage Coach Driver and Mule Skinner (1883)”–that being the year of his birth. Jim describes his first job driving a six-horse team from Fruitland to Elinore (Camp Five); getting a job driving an overland stage from Dyerville to Harris; working a six-mule team with two wagons hauling tanbark, ties, and lumber on the Mendocino Coast, then driving team for the Wagner Leather Company from Briceland to Shelter Cove. Around that time, Jim met and married his beautiful Birdie Harrow, and spent the last of his teaming days working for Lewis Roscoe, bringing tanbark from Upper Mattole to the wharf at the mouth of the river, which was owned by Calvin Stewart and the Mattole Lumber Co. Eventually, he was driving a truck for the Wagner Leather Co., then he became a bus driver, working for a conglomerate that became the West Coast Transit Company, eventually supplanted by Greyhound. He finishes his story, “For many years I hauled for hire, logs and lumber. I sold my equipment in 1951 and have been retired ever since. My hobby was driving team and riding broncs–most of my life has been put in on this hobby.” (Read the whole story by finding it at your local library, or asking me at the MVHS office.)

This is Shelter Cove. Someone fill me in on what's going on here. Unloading hay from the loco-mobile, or barrels of tanbark extract?

This is Shelter Cove. Someone fill me in on what’s going on here. Unloading hay from the loco-mobile, or readying barrels of tanbark extract for shipment? And is “loco-mobile” another way of saying “trailer truck”–a locomotive pulling trailers, on wheels?

Before leaving this post, i would like to thank Phillip Nicklas very much for giving us these images. Please do not repost the pictures without asking permission, and giving due credit to Phillip! There will be more put up here soon, photographs from around 1920 until the ’40s. I hope you have enjoyed these!

Back to the older generation. Here are Katherine, better known as Kate, Titus, and her husband Joel Fletcher

The older generation again. Here are Katherine, better known as Kate, Titus, and her husband Joel Fletcher “Fletch” Harrow, parents of Birdie Harrow Boots. And below, a more formal portrait of the pair, probably from around their 1884 wedding:

Fletch and Kate Harrow, lo-res

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